ACT on ACCEPTANCE: make the REF 2021

Act_on_acceptance_March_2018

What is Act on Acceptance?

From 1st April 2018, changes to HEFCE’s open access policy require researchers to submit their work to City Research Online within 3 months of acceptance to be eligible for the next REF.

As soon as you know your research will be published in a peer-reviewed journal, or conference proceedings, Act on Acceptance and make your research open access.

What do you have to do?

  • Upload your publications to your Publications profile as soon as possible after they have been accepted for publication.
  • Make sure it’s the accepted manuscript and not the published version: the accepted version is peer-reviewed but not typeset for publication.

What happens next?

The Publications Team will check your deposits to make sure they are compliant with the HEFCE policy, and the publishers’ terms and conditions regarding copyright and embargo periods. Once these checks are complete, they will make them available in the City Research Online repository.

What if you need help?

If you need help with depositing papers, or have questions about the open access policy, you can consult the City Research Online and Publications library guides.

Alternatively, you can contact the Publications Team who will:

  • Answer enquiries by telephone and email.
  • Meet with you in one to one appointments.
  • Help you understand the HEFCE open access policy.
  • Help you upload your papers to your publications profile.
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Research Resource of the Month: Cite Them Right Online

Cite Them Right Online is a great tool that gives you quick access to reference layouts for hundreds of different source types, from journal articles to Facebook posts to financial reports – even citing dance recitals is covered!  The main reference style is Harvard, but you can also find options for MLA, APA, MHRA, Vancouver and Chicago for many common types of source.

The “basics” section gives a whistle-stop tour of the background behind referencing: why we do it, what it is, and how to set citations out in your writing. You can also find out more about quoting, paraphrasing and summarizing, and how to lay out a Harvard Style reference list. There’s also a section on the main rules for the other referencing systems it covers.

Cite Them Right Online is for you if:

  • You mostly use Harvard
  • You prefer to do your referencing by hand rather than use bibliographic management software
  • You need a reference source so you can check if your bibliographic management software has made a mistake!
  • You’re looking for a simple tool to help your students learn to reference properly from scratch.

There’s also a book version of Cite Them Right Online if you’d rather use a print copy: find it in our libraries at 808.027 PEA.

Prefer to let software do the work for you? Find out more about ProQuest RefWorks.

Research resource of the month: Westlaw UK

This month we are focusing on Westlaw UK, which is one of the major legal databases we subscribe to at City.  It is a great resource for researching UK and EU case law and legislation, and for reading legal journal articles and selected practitioner texts.

Here are some key benefits and highlights:

  • Westlaw Insight (available from the Insight tab at the top left of the Westlaw UK screen) is a useful place to start when researching an unfamiliar area of law. It is a legal encyclopaedia which has articles on a broad range of UK legal topics. So if you need the lowdown on such diverse subjects as fracking, internet trolling or food labelling, then Westlaw Insight is a good place to get started!
  • Westlaw UK offers a ‘Case Analysis’ feature which enables you to carry out more detailed research around a particular court case, for example to find out about related cases and to discover relevant journal articles. The ‘Legislation Analysis’ feature works in a similar way in order to provide you with extra information about Acts of Parliament.
  • Another benefit of using Westlaw UK for your legal research is that it contains the Westlaw Legal Journals Index. This means that when you search Westlaw for journal articles, you are able to search through hundreds of English language legal journals published in the UK or Europe. You might sometimes find an abstract of an article rather than the full-text article, in which case just check on CityLibrary Search whether we have full-text access to the journal in question through another database.
  • Westlaw UK doesn’t just offer UK and EU legal materials: it also contains an ‘International Materials’ section (available from the Services tab at the top of the screen) which gives access to primary legal materials, journal articles and books from many other countries. In particular, there is a wealth of US legal information available through ‘International Materials’.
  • One final highlight is the ability to set up personalised searches and alerts. When logging into Westlaw UK, you will see a pop-up box entitled ‘Log in to My Westlaw UK Profile’. Click on ‘Create Profile’, and you will be able to create a personalised account. Once your account has been set up,  you can create regular alerts (based on pre-set legal topics or on your own specific searches) and have them delivered daily, weekly, fortnightly or monthly into your City email account.

City staff and students who would like further help with using Westlaw UK can make an appointment with a law librarian, or can book a place on one of our upcoming Westlaw certification sessions or Westlaw drop-in session.

Research resource of the month: BrowZine

BrowZine is a great online resource that enables you to easily browse, read and monitor current journal content from CityLibrary either online or from an app on your mobile device.

What are the main features of BrowZine?                                                                             
  • Search for journals by title, ISSN or subject term.
  • Browse current and previous issues of journal collections.
  • Create customisable bookshelves of your favourite journal titles.
  • View the table of contents, read or save articles as new issues are published.
  • Share articles on social media or export citations to ProQuest RefWorks
  • Once installed, the first time you open the app you can choose your library from a drop down list. Select “City, University of London” then enter your City username and password into the login screen.

    Download BrowZine from http://thirdiron.com/download-browzine/ by choosing the appropriate link for your Android or iOS mobile device.

 

ORCID: how to set up a unique researcher identifier

What is ORCID?

ORCID – which stands for ‘Open Researcher and Contributor ID’ – is a system whereby researchers are given a unique digital identifier, which distinguishes them from other researchers. This can be very useful when you share the same name with other people!

In addition, by using an ORCID ID during the publishing process and other professional activities (e.g. grant applications), this will facilitate automatic linking of these activities and published works.

How to set up an ORCID ID and link it to City Research Online

Setting up your ID is free and easy to do.  The best way to do it is through the City Research Online Publications database, because having an ORCID can help with managing your publications and professional activities in the database. Lenka Shipton, the Digital Repository Librarian, has created a handy guide to setting up and linking your ORCID.

CRO

Other ways you can use and publicise your ORCID

Your ORCID can be used in many ways. Here are some suggestions:

The benefits of ORCID

To sum up, the benefits of an ORCID include:

  • Having a unique identifier which distinguishes you from other researchers.
  • It is an identifier which you can keep with you, even if you move institution.
  • It can save you time by linking your grants and publications together. By adding your ORCID to the City Research Online Publications database, this will help the Publications database to pull in the outputs which have your ORCID attached to them. But please always remember to do a manual check of the Publications database, to make sure that all your publications have been recorded correctly.

If you have any questions about ORCID, please do not hesitate to contact your Research Librarian.

 

Research resource of the month: ProQuest RefWorks

What is ProQuest Refworks?

ProQuest RefWorks is an online reference management, writing and collaboration tool designed to help researchers at all levels gather, organise, store and share all types of information and to generate citations and bibliographies.

ProQuest  RefWorks can be accessed at: https://refworks.proquest.com/

You will need to click Create account the first time you use ProQuest RefWorks. You need to use your City email and you will receive a validation email which you need to click on. If you have used RefWorks Legacy before, it is strongly recommended that you choose a different password.

Use Refworks to:

  • Manage and store your references from projects and dissertations in folders.
  • Export references from CityLibrary Search and many databases and Google Scholar etc into RefWorks.
  • Create and format bibliographies in different styles and generate in text citations.
  • Save PDFs and documents directly from your computer.
  • Collaborate and share references with others.

Please remember to check any bibliographies or outputs created by ProQuest RefWorks or any other reference management tool for accuracy. If you are using Harvard style referencing, we recommend that you try the Cite Them Right Harvard style on ProQuest RefWorks  and also recommend using Cite Them Right Online,  a very useful website for citing and referencing with examples.

For more information, see our ProQuest RefWorks Library Guide.

Communicating through research

I have recently  had the opportunity to conduct some research-based practice by undertaking an MA in Academic Practice  dissertation in the Learning Enhancement and Development Department at City, University of London.

This gave me the opportunity to combine two of my interests which are teaching/ training and conducting research. I chose a topic which is related to my role of Research Librarian at City. I used this as an opportunity to engage with students individually, conduct a literature review and to combine my research data with the literature to produce a dissertation. One of the most rewarding aspects of my project was to interview students to obtain a deeper understanding of their research needs, lifecycle and challenges. I can then continue to explore to what extent my research findings can be incorporated into my professional practice.

I would say that professionally this was one of the most valuable experiences that I have had in terms of engaging with and learning from students and enhancing my own research skills at the same time .  You can read an open access version of  my article entitled Communicating through research recently published in the ALISS Quarterly.