Need to use another library for your research? Here’s how you can do it!

As a research student or member of staff at City, you can benefit from a wide range of collections held by academic and specialist libraries. So not only can you visit many other university libraries, you can also access the library collections of art galleries and professional bodies, as well as important archive collections.

We have put together a library guide which sets out the main libraries available to you. Some top picks are:

Please see our library guide for more details of the different collections held by the wide range of libraries that are available to you; also for details of how you can access them. (Note that each library will have specific rules as to how you can join – we have attempted to summarise these in our library guide).

If there are any libraries you would like to visit which aren’t covered in our guide, please contact a Research Librarian and we will check their access rules.

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Research resource of the month: IEEE Xplore

IEEE Xplore provides access to content from IEEE as well as the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET).

It contains full text of almost one-third of the world’s current literature in electrical engineering, communications, and computer science, including highly cited peer-reviewed journals, conference proceedings and standards and some archival material from the 1880s.

Search options include:

  • Basic Search—type in a key word or phrase.
  • Advanced Search—construct complex search queries.
  • Author Search—find articles by author’s name.
  • Search history, allowing you to view, edit and re-run your recent searches.
  • Select citations to print, e-mail or download directly from search results.

See the You Tube video on Advanced searching on IEEE Xplore below:

 

Enabling learning through storytelling

I recently attended a lunchtime workshop run by the City Academy on narratives and storytelling based on a performance arts approach. I’m interested in both using the telling of stories or experiences to explain concepts but also in hearing the narratives of students. The basic idea of this is that the use of stories or narratives may help to engage an audience and be more memorable than relating facts.

The Higher Education Academy (2018) states learning through storytelling: “Refers to a process in which learning is structured around a narrative or story as a means of sense-making”.

Some ideas for using this in teaching and training:

  • Create an impact for example telling your own story.
  • Listen to the narratives of the learning experiences of students.
  • Set a scenario or tell the story of a project.
  • An embedded narrative can be used to make a memorable point. “This small, storytelling moment was just a fraction of a sense-making constellation that, told across multiple settings and audiences, combined to make an always-evolving whole” (Selland, 2017, p. 245).

Some tips for using the technique:

Have a strong opening to encourage active listening such as: make a bold statement or assertion, ask a question.

Have a logical flow to the narrative: Challenge – Choices (made) – Solution or Conclusion.

Speak clearly and project your voice to increase engagement.

Make eye-contact either around the room or at relevant points with individuals.

Share what you are comfortable with and be self aware and genuine.

 

 

 

 

 

On reflection, I realised that I probably use this approach at times in a workshop or training context both by speaking of my own experiences of things I found useful and asking students for their stories and experiences too. Recently, someone told me that they remembered me because I mentioned my experience of studying in a workshop recently and it was something with which they identified too.

References

Higher Education Academy (2018) Learning through storytelling. Available at: https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/knowledge-hub/learning-through-storytelling (Accessed: 04 May 2018).

Selland, M. K. (2017) ‘The edge of messy: interplays of daily storytelling and grand narratives in teacher learning’, Teachers and Teaching, 23(4), pp. 244-261. doi: 10.1080/13540602.2016.1205016.

Research Resource of the Month: Cite Them Right Online

Cite Them Right Online is a great tool that gives you quick access to reference layouts for hundreds of different source types, from journal articles to Facebook posts to financial reports – even citing dance recitals is covered!  The main reference style is Harvard, but you can also find options for MLA, APA, MHRA, Vancouver and Chicago for many common types of source.

The “basics” section gives a whistle-stop tour of the background behind referencing: why we do it, what it is, and how to set citations out in your writing. You can also find out more about quoting, paraphrasing and summarizing, and how to lay out a Harvard Style reference list. There’s also a section on the main rules for the other referencing systems it covers.

Cite Them Right Online is for you if:

  • You mostly use Harvard
  • You prefer to do your referencing by hand rather than use bibliographic management software
  • You need a reference source so you can check if your bibliographic management software has made a mistake!
  • You’re looking for a simple tool to help your students learn to reference properly from scratch.

There’s also a book version of Cite Them Right Online if you’d rather use a print copy: find it in our libraries at 808.027 PEA.

Prefer to let software do the work for you? Find out more about ProQuest RefWorks.

Research resource of the month: BrowZine

BrowZine is a great online resource that enables you to easily browse, read and monitor current journal content from CityLibrary either online or from an app on your mobile device.

What are the main features of BrowZine?                                                                             
  • Search for journals by title, ISSN or subject term.
  • Browse current and previous issues of journal collections.
  • Create customisable bookshelves of your favourite journal titles.
  • View the table of contents, read or save articles as new issues are published.
  • Share articles on social media or export citations to ProQuest RefWorks
  • Once installed, the first time you open the app you can choose your library from a drop down list. Select “City, University of London” then enter your City username and password into the login screen.

    Download BrowZine from http://thirdiron.com/download-browzine/ by choosing the appropriate link for your Android or iOS mobile device.

 

UK Data Service webinars 2016

The UK Data Service has just released its 2016 programme of webinars introducing different aspects of their service and explaining their key datasets.

Introductory webinars:

  • Introduction to the UK Data Service – 21 January, 20 April, 12 October
  • Finding and accessing data in the UK Data Service – 9 March, 28 April, 19 October
  • Key issues in reusing data – 4 February, 4 May, 26 October
  • Data management basics – 11 February, 12 May, 3 November

Key datasets:

  • UK and cross-national surveys – 18 February, 10 November
  • Census data, 24 February – 17 November
  • Longitudinal surveys – 2 March, 24 November
  • International time series – 27 January, 1 December
  • Qualitative data – 16 March, 6 December
  • Business data – 23 March, 12 December

All webinars begin at 3pm and can be booked here.

Some database searching tips

1. Define key concepts:
Use dictionaries, online encyclopedias, textbooks, thesauri, some databases have a thesaurus or list of subject terms.

2. Use alternative words:
Eg. synonyms Heart attack, cardiac arrest, myocardial infarction
Broader/ narrower terms: Eg Linguistics grammar/ word/ sentence/ phrase

3. Search for variants of words, this may assist with UK/ US spellings:

Truncation symbols (usually *)
For example: parent* usually locates parent, parents, parental, parenthood etc.
Wildcard (usually ?) For example wom?n locates woman, women, women etc.

4. Sometimes searching for words in speech marks as a phrase eg. “French culture” may help.

5. Search logic: Use AND, OR or NOT to construct a search

Leopards AND tigers narrows the search to records containing both terms.

Leopards OR tigers broadens the search to records containing either term.

Leopards NOT tigers excludes records containing the term tigers.

6. Use any search history function on the database to edit or rerun your search or combine searches you have done.

7. Do it all again…