Happy New Year – Moving to new blog platform

New year, new address:  https://blogs.city.ac.uk/citylibresearchers/

Happy New Year!   Just to let you know that we are moving this blog to a new City, University of London platform and giving it a brand new look.

We would be delighted if you would like to continue reading the blog in the new format and you can subscribe via email by visiting https://blogs.city.ac.uk/citylibresearchers/ and you can subscribe via email at the bottom right hand side of the screen.

This site will continue to run in parallel for the new few months.

We look forward to seeing you there.

 

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Project Euclid

 

 

Project Euclid is an online publishing service driven by libraries, publishers and academics in the fields of theoretical and applied mathematics and statistics. It offers access to a growing platform of high-quality, peer-reviewed journals, books and conference proceedings.

New features include:

Improved searching, citation exports, publisher landing pages, mobile optimisation, e-mail alerts, and access indicators for all content.

Content

All users have access to table of contents pages and article abstract pages. Project Euclid has made 70% of its journal articles openly available with over 1.2 million pages of open-access content.

You can browse titles such as the Journal of Applied Mathematics available via CityLibrary’s subscription.

Email alerts and RSS feeds

Users can register to follow publications by receiving an emailed table of contents when a new issue is published. They can also sign up to new issues or articles of any publication in their RSS feeds. There is a list of feeds for books and journals.

Twitter

Follow Project Euclid on Twitter.

Sunday Times Digital Archive 1822-2006

Sunday Times blog post

The Sunday Times has provided comment and analysis since 1822 both on weekly news and on societal issues in general.  City Library Services subscribes to The Sunday Times Digital Archive  which provides a complete searchable run of the newspaper from 1822 to 2006.

The nineteenth century content has previously not been very accessible and has been largely unexplored but the archive now provides researchers with a large range of social, historic and cultural content and insights.

The twentieth and twenty first century content is well known for its investigative approach to journalism and in-depth and well researched stories.

It is a great resource which is of general interest and is especially useful for humanities and social sciences courses such as History, Journalism, Politics and Cultural Studies.

You can access the Sunday Times Digital Archive directly from the Databases A-Z on the CityLibrary homepage by using your City IT username and password.

See also our Newspaper guide for both current and historic newspaper content.

Times Higher Education

Library Services are delighted to bring you access to the Times Higher Education. This allows you to keep up to date with the latest developments and news in the higher education sector.

All  City staff and students can obtain access to the Times Higher Education via the Library. With our institutional subscription, you can read online articles and digital editions and also download the app to your device.

Follow the instructions below to set up your account. Remember to use your university email address when you register to enjoy all the benefits of our subscription.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read online

  • To set up your Times Higher Education account, go to the magazine’s homepage at www.timeshighereducation.com.
  • Click the person icon in the top right corner.
  • Follow the instructions on screen. Remember to use your university email address when you register.

Access digital editions

  • To access digital editions of Times Higher Education, go to the magazine’s homepage at www.timeshighereducation.com.
  • Click the “Professional” tab, then click “Digital Editions”.
  • Then simply select the issue you want to view.

Download the app

  • The Times Higher Education app is available on iOS, Android and Kindle Fire. Visit your app store provider to download it to your phone.
  • Select the edition you would like to view (e.g. UK or Global).
  • Log in by clicking on the icon in the top right corner.
  • Select Account, then click “Existing THE account”.
  • Enter your username and password.

 

Research resource of the month: Sage Research Methods Online

SAGE Research Methods Online is a useful online resource for anyone doing research or learning how to conduct research.

Its coverage spans the full range of research methods used in the social and behavioural sciences, plus a wide range of methods commonly used in science, technology, medicine, and the humanities.

With more than 800 books, reference works, journal articles, and videos from SAGE’s world-renowned research methods list, it provides information on writing a research question, conducting a literature review, choosing a research method, collecting and analyzing data, and writing up the findings.

Some features include:

  • Titles from SAGE’s renowned book, journal, and reference content in Research Methods.
  • The Methods Map visualises relationships among unique methods terms, concepts, and people.
  • Methods Lists can be used to compile selected books, book chapters, and journal articles for later review or to share with colleagues.
  • Videos, cases and podcasts.

See also an introductory video (click the link and scroll to the bottom of the page).

You can access Sage Research Methods Online from CityLibrary Search or from our Databases A-Z.

 

Research resource of the month: IEEE Xplore

IEEE Xplore provides access to content from IEEE as well as the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET).

It contains full text of almost one-third of the world’s current literature in electrical engineering, communications, and computer science, including highly cited peer-reviewed journals, conference proceedings and standards and some archival material from the 1880s.

Search options include:

  • Basic Search—type in a key word or phrase.
  • Advanced Search—construct complex search queries.
  • Author Search—find articles by author’s name.
  • Search history, allowing you to view, edit and re-run your recent searches.
  • Select citations to print, e-mail or download directly from search results.

See the You Tube video on Advanced searching on IEEE Xplore below:

 

Enabling learning through storytelling

I recently attended a lunchtime workshop run by the City Academy on narratives and storytelling based on a performance arts approach. I’m interested in both using the telling of stories or experiences to explain concepts but also in hearing the narratives of students. The basic idea of this is that the use of stories or narratives may help to engage an audience and be more memorable than relating facts.

The Higher Education Academy (2018) states learning through storytelling: “Refers to a process in which learning is structured around a narrative or story as a means of sense-making”.

Some ideas for using this in teaching and training:

  • Create an impact for example telling your own story.
  • Listen to the narratives of the learning experiences of students.
  • Set a scenario or tell the story of a project.
  • An embedded narrative can be used to make a memorable point. “This small, storytelling moment was just a fraction of a sense-making constellation that, told across multiple settings and audiences, combined to make an always-evolving whole” (Selland, 2017, p. 245).

Some tips for using the technique:

Have a strong opening to encourage active listening such as: make a bold statement or assertion, ask a question.

Have a logical flow to the narrative: Challenge – Choices (made) – Solution or Conclusion.

Speak clearly and project your voice to increase engagement.

Make eye-contact either around the room or at relevant points with individuals.

Share what you are comfortable with and be self aware and genuine.

 

 

 

 

 

On reflection, I realised that I probably use this approach at times in a workshop or training context both by speaking of my own experiences of things I found useful and asking students for their stories and experiences too. Recently, someone told me that they remembered me because I mentioned my experience of studying in a workshop recently and it was something with which they identified too.

References

Higher Education Academy (2018) Learning through storytelling. Available at: https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/knowledge-hub/learning-through-storytelling (Accessed: 04 May 2018).

Selland, M. K. (2017) ‘The edge of messy: interplays of daily storytelling and grand narratives in teacher learning’, Teachers and Teaching, 23(4), pp. 244-261. doi: 10.1080/13540602.2016.1205016.