CityLibrary/ CityLIS Library Guides focus group workshops 2018

LibGuides is an easy to use content management system which is used by City, University of London Library Services and  libraries across the world to create small websites which are called ‘guides’.  LibGuides is owned by a company called Springshare and is part of a suite of products called LibApps, this includes LibCal (used to manage workshop, room and computer bookings) and LibWizard which is used to create quizzes, tutorials and other interactive content.

Within Library Services at City, we have a number of cross-team operational and project groups which enable us to work with colleagues from other teams and sites within the library.  We have found this approach to be successful, for example in the area of employability

One of these groups is our Library Guides group. An aim of this group is to lead on the future direction and development of Library guides. We were aware of the excellent potential of us collaborating with students from CityLIS,  our internationally renowned Library School.  User-centred design is useful to identify with users and include their ideas into service development (German, 2017).

We decided this year to offer workshops to CityLIS students to make them aware of our innovative use of Library Guides  and other Springshare products and our use of technologies but also to obtain their insights and feedback.  We felt that a knowledge of these tools would an advantage to students because they are so prevalent in many organisations.

We introduced a new Library guides home page in the summer of 2017 and the students gave us feedback on the design and clarity of this. We also looked at examples of some of our guides and those from other institutions.

Some aspects we discussed were:

  • It is key to consider the audience, purpose and objectives.
  • Front loading of important content in a prominent place on the guide.
  • The benefits of clear guide design and navigation.
  • Using bullet points or small paragraphs of text and having some white space on the page.
  • Incorporate accessibility features and consider ease of use eg. clicking/ scrolling.
  • Use of language and avoidance of jargon/terminology or acronyms providing a glossary.
  • Students highlighted the inter-disciplinary nature of LIS and the fact that is a postgraduate course.

Our Information Literacy Group has developed a new, introductory online guide (City, University of London Library Services, 2017) and a workshop series called Library Essentials and we also took the  opportunity to produce short videos on using the library (see slides on some of our use of technologies).

Our workshop presentation is below:

We have collated student feedback from our workshops and will be trying to incorporate it into some of our guide design and content and will also look for opportunities for collaboration and discussion and the sharing of expertise with CityLIS students. One thing we are looking to do is to develop learning objectives for our guides and to consider tailoring them to a specific audiences.

German, E. (2017). ‘LibGuides for instruction: a service design point of view from an academic library’, Reference and User Services Quarterly, 56(3), p. 162-167. Available at:  http://dx.doi.org/10.5860/rusq.56n3.162

Alex Asman (Subject Librarian, Arts)  and Diane Bell (Research Librarian)

City, University of London.

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Research Resource of the Month: EBSCOHost

EBSCO is a major academic database supplier, covering a wide selection of journals, trade publications and other literature in all sorts of subjects. EBSCOHost is their online platform.

You’ve probably used EBSCOHost before: City Library Services subscribe to their databases for all our subjects.  Find out which is best for you using our Library Guides, in CityLibrary Search, or by browsing our Database A-Z .

You can search EBSCOhost databases individually to narrow your search down to a specific subject, or choose a combination of databases to search across all at once – use the ‘Choose Databases’ link just above your search box to change this at any time.

The advanced search options can create powerful, specific searches to get the most relevant literature, and the ‘Search History’ option lets you view, edit and save your past searches.  When you’ve found an article you want, you can save the PDF, email it, create a citation for it to copy and paste, or use the ‘Export’ button to add it to your favourite bibliographic management tool.

The EBSCO databases we subscribe to are:

  • Academic Search Complete
  • Art Full Text
  • Business Source Complete
  • CINAHL Complete
  • Communication Source
  • Criminal Justice Abstracts with Full Text
  • EconLit with Full Text
  • European Views of the Americas, 1493-1750
  • GreenFILE
  • Health and Psychosocial Instruments
  • Health Policy Reference Center
  • Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text
  • MathSciNet
  • MEDLINE Complete
  • Political Science Complete
  • PsycArticles and PsycINFO
  • PsycTESTS
  • RILM Abstracts of Music Literature
  • SOCIndex

We also take several ebooks packages on EBSCOHost, too.  Enjoy using EBSCO databases and get in touch with your Research Librarian if you’d like to know more.

ACT on ACCEPTANCE: make the REF 2021

Act_on_acceptance_March_2018

What is Act on Acceptance?

From 1st April 2018, changes to HEFCE’s open access policy require researchers to submit their work to City Research Online within 3 months of acceptance to be eligible for the next REF.

As soon as you know your research will be published in a peer-reviewed journal, or conference proceedings, Act on Acceptance and make your research open access.

What do you have to do?

  • Upload your publications to your Publications profile as soon as possible after they have been accepted for publication.
  • Make sure it’s the accepted manuscript and not the published version: the accepted version is peer-reviewed but not typeset for publication.

What happens next?

The Publications Team will check your deposits to make sure they are compliant with the HEFCE policy, and the publishers’ terms and conditions regarding copyright and embargo periods. Once these checks are complete, they will make them available in the City Research Online repository.

What if you need help?

If you need help with depositing papers, or have questions about the open access policy, you can consult the City Research Online and Publications library guides.

Alternatively, you can contact the Publications Team who will:

  • Answer enquiries by telephone and email.
  • Meet with you in one to one appointments.
  • Help you understand the HEFCE open access policy.
  • Help you upload your papers to your publications profile.

Research Resource of the Month: Cite Them Right Online

Cite Them Right Online is a great tool that gives you quick access to reference layouts for hundreds of different source types, from journal articles to Facebook posts to financial reports – even citing dance recitals is covered!  The main reference style is Harvard, but you can also find options for MLA, APA, MHRA, Vancouver and Chicago for many common types of source.

The “basics” section gives a whistle-stop tour of the background behind referencing: why we do it, what it is, and how to set citations out in your writing. You can also find out more about quoting, paraphrasing and summarizing, and how to lay out a Harvard Style reference list. There’s also a section on the main rules for the other referencing systems it covers.

Cite Them Right Online is for you if:

  • You mostly use Harvard
  • You prefer to do your referencing by hand rather than use bibliographic management software
  • You need a reference source so you can check if your bibliographic management software has made a mistake!
  • You’re looking for a simple tool to help your students learn to reference properly from scratch.

There’s also a book version of Cite Them Right Online if you’d rather use a print copy: find it in our libraries at 808.027 PEA.

Prefer to let software do the work for you? Find out more about ProQuest RefWorks.

Research resource of the month: Westlaw UK

This month we are focusing on Westlaw UK, which is one of the major legal databases we subscribe to at City.  It is a great resource for researching UK and EU case law and legislation, and for reading legal journal articles and selected practitioner texts.

Here are some key benefits and highlights:

  • Westlaw Insight (available from the Insight tab at the top left of the Westlaw UK screen) is a useful place to start when researching an unfamiliar area of law. It is a legal encyclopaedia which has articles on a broad range of UK legal topics. So if you need the lowdown on such diverse subjects as fracking, internet trolling or food labelling, then Westlaw Insight is a good place to get started!
  • Westlaw UK offers a ‘Case Analysis’ feature which enables you to carry out more detailed research around a particular court case, for example to find out about related cases and to discover relevant journal articles. The ‘Legislation Analysis’ feature works in a similar way in order to provide you with extra information about Acts of Parliament.
  • Another benefit of using Westlaw UK for your legal research is that it contains the Westlaw Legal Journals Index. This means that when you search Westlaw for journal articles, you are able to search through hundreds of English language legal journals published in the UK or Europe. You might sometimes find an abstract of an article rather than the full-text article, in which case just check on CityLibrary Search whether we have full-text access to the journal in question through another database.
  • Westlaw UK doesn’t just offer UK and EU legal materials: it also contains an ‘International Materials’ section (available from the Services tab at the top of the screen) which gives access to primary legal materials, journal articles and books from many other countries. In particular, there is a wealth of US legal information available through ‘International Materials’.
  • One final highlight is the ability to set up personalised searches and alerts. When logging into Westlaw UK, you will see a pop-up box entitled ‘Log in to My Westlaw UK Profile’. Click on ‘Create Profile’, and you will be able to create a personalised account. Once your account has been set up,  you can create regular alerts (based on pre-set legal topics or on your own specific searches) and have them delivered daily, weekly, fortnightly or monthly into your City email account.

City staff and students who would like further help with using Westlaw UK can make an appointment with a law librarian, or can book a place on one of our upcoming Westlaw certification sessions or Westlaw drop-in session.

Research resource of the month: BrowZine

BrowZine is a great online resource that enables you to easily browse, read and monitor current journal content from CityLibrary either online or from an app on your mobile device.

What are the main features of BrowZine?                                                                             
  • Search for journals by title, ISSN or subject term.
  • Browse current and previous issues of journal collections.
  • Create customisable bookshelves of your favourite journal titles.
  • View the table of contents, read or save articles as new issues are published.
  • Share articles on social media or export citations to ProQuest RefWorks
  • Once installed, the first time you open the app you can choose your library from a drop down list. Select “City, University of London” then enter your City username and password into the login screen.

    Download BrowZine from http://thirdiron.com/download-browzine/ by choosing the appropriate link for your Android or iOS mobile device.

 

ORCID: how to set up a unique researcher identifier

What is ORCID?

ORCID – which stands for ‘Open Researcher and Contributor ID’ – is a system whereby researchers are given a unique digital identifier, which distinguishes them from other researchers. This can be very useful when you share the same name with other people!

In addition, by using an ORCID ID during the publishing process and other professional activities (e.g. grant applications), this will facilitate automatic linking of these activities and published works.

How to set up an ORCID ID and link it to City Research Online

Setting up your ID is free and easy to do.  The best way to do it is through the City Research Online Publications database, because having an ORCID can help with managing your publications and professional activities in the database. Lenka Shipton, the Digital Repository Librarian, has created a handy guide to setting up and linking your ORCID.

CRO

Other ways you can use and publicise your ORCID

Your ORCID can be used in many ways. Here are some suggestions:

The benefits of ORCID

To sum up, the benefits of an ORCID include:

  • Having a unique identifier which distinguishes you from other researchers.
  • It is an identifier which you can keep with you, even if you move institution.
  • It can save you time by linking your grants and publications together. By adding your ORCID to the City Research Online Publications database, this will help the Publications database to pull in the outputs which have your ORCID attached to them. But please always remember to do a manual check of the Publications database, to make sure that all your publications have been recorded correctly.

If you have any questions about ORCID, please do not hesitate to contact your Research Librarian.